Skip to main content

About your Search

WHUT (Howard University Television) 9
( more )
English 70
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
will the global economy go next and what will it mean to your portfolio as the u.s. stock market sets a new five-year high. >>> i'll have any candid conversation with outspoken jpmorgan chase ceo jamie dimon. we'll talk real estate, banking, his pay cut. >> we had run terrible year. >>> and she's called the oprah of china. remarkable entrepreneur who runs a media empire and reaches more than 200 million people a month. "on the money" begins right now. >>> this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now, maria bartiromo. >> this is what's making news as we head into a new week "on the money." washington has a new watchdog for wall street. president obama has nominated mary jo white the head of securities and exchange commission. white is a former prosecutor with a reputation for toughness. she will replace mary schapiro and must still be confirmed by the senate. timothy geithner spent his last day as secretary on friday, stepping down after a tumultuous four years in the financial system. president obama's chief of staff jack lew has been nominated to replace geithner. >>
the economy, about where the markets would go post financial crisis. what's next for america and the global economy? ken rogoff joining me once again with some answers. ken, good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. how would you describe the mood in davos and how would you see the economy today five years post the crisis? >> it's a strange mood in davos, where people are not euphoric. in fact, you talk to heads of multinational corporations, businesspeople around the world, they say, you know, things aren't even as good as i thought they would be this quarter, but they're calmer. there's a feeling that the world is not going to fall apart. you hear more about geopolitical risk, cyber security, d less about europe's going to blow up tomorrow. >> so, you're not seeing over enthusiasm but it's certainly better than a year ago? >> yes, it's definitely, definitely calmer. their theme here is resilient. yes, and dynamism, not so much. guess what i thought about the global economy. i actually think that growth will be moderate with not necessarily a lot of volatility
as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, in 2014. the program is expected to be maintained in the future. following the meeting prime minister and revital minister reported on the release of the joint statement to prime minister abe at his office. >> translator: the government strongly hopes the bank of japan will a monetary easing policy in order to achieve the goal. >> translator: the bank of japan believes it is important to realize sustainable growth by overcoming deflation at an early stage and achieving price stability. it is vital to strengthen o
economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we wanted to remain that way. the political debated home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders from the eu and the other sort of entities that are here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all of this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> we have a natural gas boom and we have an oil boom and we have, thanks to low interest rates, what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much more can happen and, in fact, it seems like the only body, the only institution that might stand in the way of 2013 being a great year is congress. >> well, listen, there is certainly not the outcome that anybody wants. and i'm hoping that after we've been through the election and last november. we've been through a fiscal cliff debate. we are working our way through a debt ceiling debate. i think in a responsible manner. with an e
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
in the arab world, which have taken their toll on the country's tourism industry. the economy has come to a standstill. unemployment is high. life is tougher than ever for the poor. this teacher has a big family to support. two wives, seven children. he has been hard hit by hikes in fuel prices this winter. >> the government needs to take care of the middle class. across the world, it is the middle-class sees that support the government. as long as they are not impoverished. then he says that if the political system stays the same, nothing will change. he is part of an opposition movement which boycotted the elections. as far as he is concerned, the king can stay in office, but only as a figurehead. >> the movement is calling for a change in the regime, and if that does not happen, then the next step would be the overthrow of the regime. that means the king. >> jordan is looking for a smooth transition to more democracy without a civil war like syria or an islamist government as in egypt. what happens all depends on how willing the king is to bring about change. >> tensions are running
, is the worst thing in the world. here is why, the economy is growing, housing is recovering and we're going to get a little bit of relief here. as the economy grows, we hope that-- we're going to-- >> adam. >> the problem that you have adam, as the economy is growing, and we're coming slowly out of this recession, you've got more taxes coming, payroll taxes are going up and you're going to have the higher rates, ben says is great, rich need to pay more, but basically keeps the lights on for three days and by the way, then you have obamacare taxes. >> and then here is the thing, gerri, there's never the right time. listen, it's not about punting right now. this is an extension -- remember the deal before with the debt ceiling, supposed to be the ultimate deal we'd never have to punt again. this leads to another punt, another punt and things are getting better let's not do it now. things are getting worse, let's not do it it now. and it's raining outside, let's not do it. let gerri talk for a minutes. >> according to the democrats, they're standing in the way of this. never seem to get anythi
must do better -- >> britain's economy shrank by 2.3%, worse than expected. i could make it more difficult, more expensive for it to borrow. since 2008, britain has emerged from the recession twice now, only to slide back into economic contraction, a double-dip recession. there has never been a triple- dip since the 1950's. actually, uk firms are still hiring people. >> when you look at employment, you have to look at the part of wage growth, and wage growth is negative in real terms. if you take into account inflation. the u.k.'s competitiveness is still improving, and that is why firms who are not getting the headline numbers are still willing to take people on. that is why you see this dichotomy between the employment situation, what is happening to the economy. >> u.k. figures are not good. how does the u.k. compared to continental europe? >> in terms of growth, it is difficult to compare because they go in and out of recession at different times. the unemployment is one of the key ones. britain has done remarkably well. it is something of a mystery, and it has to do with tha
. the country's economy is stagnant. most people subsist on a minimum amount of food. authorities use these launches and nuclear tests to calm these people. north korea is a great country. they even separate them, as we saw last month. as time goals on, kim's scientists and engineers will gain more knowledge and his military will become more powerful. diplomats need to use talks to counter that. and they need to encourage chinese officials to be more active in the process. >> all right. thanks, kengo. >>> voters in israel have the ruling right wing bloc now has fewer seats in the the 120-member kanesset. centrist parties and an extreme right-wing parties made gains. vote-counting is nearly finished. the right-wing bloc led by the likud party won the highest number of seats. it will take about 30, down from the 42 it held before the vote. >> translator: thank you for giving me the chance to lead israel for a third time. we must form as large a coalition as possible. i've already started on this mission tonight. >> the centrist yeshitit or there is a future party, and a stra left labor
actually a friend of the system and the economy. take a listen to this one. >> i think jpmorgan was a -- was not just a fair weather friend. we were there in good times and bad times for everybody, including nations. for spain and italy we will tell you -- we were lending $15 billion net of collateral. net derivatives, spain and italy. yes, it's governments and multi- nationals if you want to be transparent. what would you do? what would you all do? if you were my board of directors, it's easy to say don't take the risk. move out. we've been in spain and italy, one for 60 years, wur finish over 100 -- one for over 100. we're not a fair weather friend. companies want us there. we have to manage that risk. something may go wrong. >> got to tell you guys, the feedback after that panel was actually not good. a lot of people criticizing jamie just in the hallways. obviously a lot of people happy to see him defending the bank. a lot of bankers here. the mood, nature of where we are. there was some criticism. the other big news, by the way, not happening in davos -- yeah? >> i was goin
a hint. sometimes it goes up before the economy is improving. we don't need monetary policy to drive stocks. >> that's why it's going up? >> the market? >> the yield. >> well, i think because the economy overall is improving and we're going to see some flows back in equities. that's why i think yields are actually starting to slowly go up. because it's starting to rejoin with gdp. >> benedict? >> i couldn't agree more. great numbers out of china. i think china is far more important than the european situation. and as yields go up, the exposure in your bond portfolio, the interest rates will have a drop on your yield. you got to be in equities. >> ben willis, b. belski. thank you. now, maria. >>> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? welcome back to "the closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of the new york stock exchange. the dow six-day winning streak in jeopardy tonight with a decline on the session. yahoo numbers are out. dow jones industrial down 12 points at 13,883. nasdaq finished positive just by a fraction. up about 4.5 points. and s&p 500
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
with their best strategy and the outcome for both the market and the economy. don't go anywhere. more "money" coming up. ♪ twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares re, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. lori: all right. back to business in washington now republicans hold a big vote to whether or not to extend the debt limit until may. if congress doesn't pass a budget by april 15th they no longer get paid! i have no problem with that. our panel is here with their take on the strategy. we have our favorite economist, peter morici. the always amazing scott martin, chief market strategist with united advisors and former democratic congressman
the american, the japanese and american economy. there is going to be hell to pay and it's going to happen soon. >> you're holding your news and buying. >> neil henessey, can we get back to all-time highs for the dow and the s&p. >> oh, michelle, i think easily. if you look at the dow jones right now, the price-to-sales ratio is 1.28. the most it will go up to is 1.5 so that leaves 17% on the upside or if hundred points. more importantly you look at the s&p 500 companies, they are sitting on 1.5 trillion in cash, 1.5 trillion -- >> hold on. you think 2,300 points in the dow? what are you talking about? >> very much so. >> i mean. you're talking about the high in 2007, michelle, was when the price-to-sales ratio of the dow jones was at 1.8. we're 40% away from that number, but, i mean, the companies are in great shape. there's so much cash sitting on the sidelines, and at some point in time the investors are going to get out of fix the income and move over towards equity. >> can i ask you a question and i'm very much concerned about this. what happens when the bond bubble bursts and those invest
on the economy and that, but not at the expense of social security, medicare, and medicaid >> we, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. lori: the president giving his second inaugural address this morning. rich edson now joining us from washington d.c., and that was certainly a politically partisan address we heard from the president. >> reporter: well, it was a defense of the political theory, awaited the u.s. should be governed and should govern itself. i would almost characterize it as something along the lines of a response to what we heard from president reagan in 1981 when he said government is not the solution to our problems, it is the problem. president obama making the case that the government is not necessarily our problem. together we could do great things. together w
's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking with the palace. today is a day for israelis to make a choice about their next leaders. no political party has ever gained a majority in israeli elections. so there's expected to be a lot of postturing about what type of government there will be for israel over the next four years. my colleague looks at what is on the ballot box today. >> israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu was cheery this morning as he arrives to vote. by the end of the day he will likely have something more to be chief about. the leader of the party is expected to come out on top and keep his job. but at jerusalem's main market the lack of suspense means there's little fever. they talk about israel being divided and disillusioned. most take it as a give than benjamin netanyahu will remain in office. >> if you ask me, nothing. no b.b., no nothing. >
soros said that he was not impressed with stimulus uppers to fix the global economy. -- effort to fix the global economy. >> most of the top has been about the global economic malaise. it is the home of the world economic forum based in the height of switzerland and year. the main focus has been on the eurozone and whether or not there are any green shoots of recovery. >> more than 1000 delegates have taught here over the course of five days for the ways to kill them. bill of the dream was resilient dynamism. there is plenty to plenty of resilience a little dynamism the added value is for global leaders from the public and the private side to get together and exchange ideas. people come back from here, a batteriesed,, loaded. >> the form called for an unprecedented $14 trillion dollars to make environmentally friendly. without decisive steps to protect the plan, sustainable growth cannot be guaranteed. >> the other big prices is the referendum on the european union and the crisis in the eurozone. it ranged high all week. they set out their visions for economic recovery. >> as my colle
the budget, how to grow the economy. that's the kind of debate the country desevens. by the way, if we keep going down this path, we will have a debt crisis. it's not an if question, it's a when question. >> i remember him, alternativest young congressman from wisconsin that used to come on "squawk box." >> still fighting budget balthsds. >> if he's going to go on somewhere, at least he went on with david. congress must pass a stopgap spending bill by march 27th to keep the u.s. government running. and don't do that with your sneezes. >> what was that? i held it in. >> that's like -- >> i've been trying to hold it in because you were talking. >> no, no, it's going to come out. that's bad for you. something inside is going to pop or something. like an anneurism. it's bad to be repressed like that. let it out. >> that's his whole life. >> oh. >> let it out. >> michelle caruso ka brar ray. you're like a guest on the show, but thank you for being kind. >> it's the greatest feeling in the world. let it out. >> yeah, others have -- anyway, more trouble in egypt, a state of emergency has been decl
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
they were so-called developed economies. and so what i thought i would do here is just run through some of the lessons that we learned there that i think, unfortunately, shut up and looked at by the europeans. and they are only now starting to realize that they could have cut down the present negative situation because let's face it, europe as a whole, with a few exceptions, is in either a recession or stagnation. first, each country is unique. this is something they didn't want to see. greece adding the situation by longtime mismanagement on the fiscal side and raid the banks. in the case of ireland, it was the banks the drag the sovereign is -- sovereign as. in the case of portugal, with some portuguese in the audience here, it was basically a decade of no growth in portugal. in the case of spain, it was a bubble in real estate that was financed by mainly the savings and loan institutions, some of which have gone under, a number have gone under. and a government that basically drove up the deficit, and regional governments because regions are very important in spain, also drove up thi
. there is definitely a lot of momentum the upside. it is a sign that the economy is improving. there is a large speculation that oil demand will improve. a lot of traders do think that we have hired to go here. the rest of the energy market, gasoline futures are spiking as there is word that one of the major east coast refineries. natural gas prices down 4% in today's trading session. guys, we are nearing $100 a barrel, as far as oil prices are concerned. melissa: sandra smith, thank you so much. lori: three-week since boeing 787 had its latest incident. investigator is shifting our focus. we have the latest details just ahead. melissa: the s&p holding their five year high. ♪ the local melissa: it is time to make money with charles payne. charles: i accidentally went to ugg store. we just dumped into the door. what? i could not believe that you know, you do not like to do things on this anecdotal thing. the last time i went to a retail store that crowded with that type of enthusiasm and electricity was back in 2002. steve madden. the place was buzzing. i cracked a few jokes. no one even knew
about the economy, 8.3 fewer americans are working today than there were four years ago, what is your reaction to that? >> well, just shows you how out of touch eghe is. normally when the president is reelected, remember, no landslide. you work together, find common ground and work ford. this person's goal is to break the republican party. he's out of touch where america is at and it's more of a speech after progressive party agenda not something for all of america to get behind. >> sean: how ironic, too, the president lecturing the americans on tone and did you remember of talking about mitt romney and a steel worker's wife? >> and when you work on a president's speech in the inaugural, you usually have a take away line. what is the take away line. normally when the election is over, it's time to govern, he moved the campaign committee going when he can't run for further office. this is what this individual does. he can't govern, but that's what he continues to do is just politics. >> sean: all right, you're a leader of the republican party in the house, one area of government where
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
low, but a guest said, look, washington is going to mess up the economy. the sequestering issue is prevalent, and the debt ceiling debate is going to further erode consumer confidence, people will not spend, and the rally might be in jeopardy. i'm a real basking of hopefulness and positivity. >> thank you so much. the unions, lou dobbs weighs in on dwindling union membership, but to the point, there's a rally holding on, but a rally nonetheless. >> that's right. the s&p right now, which was above 1500, 1502 to be exact a short time ago, back to the levels we saw in 2007. we're trying to hang on to the rally, but thinking the dow was up more than a hundred points, and now it's up 3 dlsh 4 -- 41. >> will the markets hold on despite with what's going on with apple breaking down? clinging to green, approached the 1500 level not seen in years. if we end higher, that's the 7th consecutive day of gains, the longest winning streak in more than six years for the s&p. >> and no longer the apple of wall street's eye. it pummeledded as they posted the fourth most profitable company ever. >>
not to be a political football that by becoming that, does damage to our economy. >> without any question, obama's real objective is not just obamacare, but it's to eliminate any political opposition, to just wipe them off the map and the media is now telling them not only will they help, but offering advice how to do it. >> who does that look like to you? >> for the past couple of weeks, this is how we've heard about jodi arias. >> do you know who that is? >> it looks like jodi. >> prosecutors working as hard as they can to send her to death row, but tonight, we hear about jodi in a different way. it happens here, her home for now, the maximum security tower in the jail in phoenix. i was given exclusive access to this units and i met jodi. >> how are you feeling. >> this is jodi's room here, a cell. it's a small room, windows at the top and three burnings and only jodi's's in the middle and her roommate's down here. >> to the a tax threat, and nicolas sarkozy and his wife are thinking escaping france to avoid a huge tax. >> and sarkozy and his wife carla bruney except the tax rate of 75% proposed by h
second term from the domestic economy and diplomacy to climate change. he talked about values and principles common to all americans. he said prosperity must rest on the shoulders of the rising middle class. >> no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future. or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together as one nation and one people. >> obama begins his second term with several battles looming. he'll try to work with republicans in the house of representatives to revamp gun control laws and avoid defaulting on the national debt. ♪ the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air >> pop star beyonce sang the national anthem. her performance capped off the official proceedings ahead of the inaugural parade. then the president walked the capitol route from the building to the white house. the inauguration four years ago drew almost 2 million people. this time an estimated 475,000 turned out. >>> prime mi
great economies throughout the world trying to continue colonialism or imperialism or whatever you want to call it. zogby to pull back, take care of the u.s. -- we need to pull back. we are shortchanging the u.s. host: this is more from yesterday, secretary clinton giving her assessment. [video clip] >> we live in a dangerous and incredibly complicated world now with very different forces at work. state-based and non-state. technology and communication. i am older than the president. i don't want to surprise anybody by saying that. >> not by much. >> i remember some of the speeches of eisenhower as a young girl. you have got to be careful. you have to be thoughtful. you cannot rush in especially now where it's more complex than it has been in decades. so, yes, there are wicked problems like syria, absolutely. we are on the side of american values, freedom, the aspirations of all people to have a better life, to have the opportunity we are fortunate to have here. but it's not always easy proceed exactly what must be done in order to get to that outcome. so i certainly am grateful for the
economy was not a growing economy. it was a stagnating economy. virginia's agricultural economy was not a growing economy. but a stagnating one. and the reason why so many slaves were sold out of the upper south to the lower south is because in many ways there weren't new slaves needed in virginia and maryland and north carolina, where they were needed were in the new cotton lands of the southwest, and so an owner quite often might have what he considered excess capacity, and so he would sell off one or two slaves here. almost always breaking up families, because what sold and brought money in the market place were people aged 15 to 30 years. and so that usually meant breaking up families. husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers and their children. and they would be sent to richmond, which was a bit of a gathering place, and most of the slaves purchased in richmond were purchased not by slave owners but by other slave traders. so then would take them hundreds of miles away, either marching them overland where the men would be chained together two-by-two, th
turn to handouts to survive the growing economy. -- the grim economy. the russian parliament about a draft law banning homosexual propaganda. there was only one deputy that voted against it in the lower house. outside, passion spilled over to scuffles on the street. police made arrests after the gay-rights supporters were insulted by opponents. steve rosenberg reports from moscow. >> ahead of the debate inside the russian parliament, there was drama outside on the street. gay-rights activists. police detained 20 people. later, military police turned their attention to the controversial bill. pass the first hearing by a huge margin. it will prohibit the spread of homosexual propaganda in the wording which presence of children. it would mean across russia public events promoting gay rights could be broken up and the organizers find -- fined. >> we see open propaganda that harms. young people will decide on their own how to live in the future and what orientation to choose. >> this draft bill sends a bad signal to society of repression and limitation of civil rights guaranteed by the
economy will look like in a few years if we continue to follow president obama's agenda. president obama loves to beat up his predecessors and republicans for the state of the nation's economy and crisis the last few years, but in illinois we can't make such excuses. we've been following the big government model for decades and you can see where it's gotten us. stuart: and they can't meet the pensions, the fundamental problem with illinois, the pension what the argument is about. >> pension is the driver, but you look at what other states are doing, wisconsin passed collective bargaining reform, indiana and michigan have passed right to work laws and in illinois we're still beholden to the government employee unions that these politicians refuse to reform the 200 billion pension crisis we're under. stuart: ted. >> we've got to go for big fixes. stuart: right now i want to just concentrate on chicago for a second. >> okay. stuart: i'm told that the mayor, rahm emanuel, he's got a commission looking into the city's finances and that commission suggests that he they should shift their retir
the lights out. they do favor general motors. i'm saying that the rails as an indicator of the economy, may be failing, because they are so coal-based. but union pacific reports tomorrow that is less coal-based and i think they blow it out. union pacific is a winner. >> interesting point. we'll get a lot more after the break. stick around. we'll see how mcdonald's opens for trading now that we've got their earnings comps. >>> speaking of restaurants, we'll talk to ron shaich about the state of his business and what's new at the chain. [ maleu turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. whatever your business challenge, i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares fo
&p are soaring, as well. this amid positive signs about the economy, housing rebounding, and companies hiring. so is it too late if you want to jump into the stock market? find out what you should do if you've been on the sidelines until now. >>> and speaking of money, we'll tell you why you will have to spend a lot more of it if you are planning to serve chicken wings at your super bowl party next weekend. i hope you're sitting down for that. >> always got nachos. nachos are the go-to snack. >> yeah. that's what we would have at our house. >> or mac and cheese which we'll talk about later on. somebody's making mac and cheese today. >>> then we'll talk about -- just when the deadly flu season seems to be getting better now, a new concern nationwide. it's called the norovirus. what is it, how can you avoid it? we'll get to the bottom of the health threat. >>> notre dame speaking out about the manti te'o fake girlfriend scandal. what the school know, when it -- school knew, where it knew, and why the school didn't go public when it first learn good the deception. even that's confusing. >> nothing m
economies in the east and the south. now, of course, a growing world economy benefits us all, but we should be in no doubt that a new global race of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. the map of global influence is changing before our eyes. and these changes are already being felt by the entrepreneur in the netherlands, the worker in germany, the family in britain. so i want to speak to you today with urgency and frankness about the european union and how it does change, both to deliver prosperity and to retain the support of its peoples. but first, i want to set out the spirit in which i approach these issues. i know that the united kingdom is sometimes seen as an argumentative and rather strong-minded member of the family of european nations. and it is true that our geography has shaped our psychology. we have the character of an island nation. we are independent, forthright, passionate in defense of our sovereignty. we can no more change this british sensibility than we can train the english channel. and because of this sensibility, we come t
. the economy is growing, but things look pretty fragile. you may remember, early january, congress reached a last-minute deal to avoid automatic tax increases. that relief was only temporary. harsh spending cuts go into effect in march unless there is another deal. america will hit their borrowing limit at that time. congress cannot reach -- if congress cannot reach an agreement, consequences are severe. experts say that america faces a budget crisis like no other unless politicians can agree on those spending cuts and the increase in borrowing. >> he really is confronted with and will be preoccupied for the next several months with this huge fiscal problems in the united states. projections of deficits that are enormous and a clear disagreement between the president's and members of his party and the republicans in congress over what to do with it. >> let's talk about this shocking report that we have both been mentioning. the global economic downturn has hit women and girls the hardest. many households have coped with the economic pressure of the last few years by taking their children,
to receding concerns about the world's largest economy after u.s. legislators passed a bill to extend the debt ceiling. we are seeing dollar/yen at 89.61. market players say news of north korea's possible nuclear testing also fueled geo political concerns. the euro is strong at 119.46. >>> the japanese government has finalized a guideline for compiling next year's budget. it is designed to keep new bond issues to a minute mum. members of the cabinet and the council of economic and fiscal policy approved the plan. the proposal for the fiscal year that starts in april includes the government's latest economic stimulus. priority is put on cutting wasteful spending and also requires the budget to focus on two key areas, that's reconstruction work from the 2011 disaster and sectors with sustainable or promising growth. now the guidelines urge a 50% reduction in the primary balance deficit by fiscal 2015. that's aimed at clearing a milestone towards counter fiscal health. the governor will decide its draft budget on tuesday next week. >>> japan's ruling coalition parties have been talking about tax
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)